Your Hurricane Preparedness Kit

Oversized bread loaf GIF
Maybe you can find some shelf stable bread in a bulk size, just like this happy family.

I hate to say it, but if your family thrives on bread and milk, you’re probably going to have to go to the store to buy your bread and milk after the hurricane warning is announced. Bread and milk just don’t keep well in an emergency kit. The good news is that lots of other things do!

As you know, there’s usually some warning before the hurricane to give you time to purchase your comfort milks and address last minute details, but doing your major preparations now will make those last few steps go much more smoothly. Your emergency preparedness kit should be ready with essentials that you and your family will need if the power goes out or you need to evacuate. Hurricanes are notorious for causing power outages, floods, and structural damage to homes. Evacuation is often the best option.

First aid kit, hurricane preparedness

Be sure that your kit has the essentials and a couple of comfort items, but avoid cramming it with nonessentials. Keep in mind that your emergency kit should also be customized to the specific needs of the people in your group. Ready.gov, the official emergency preparedness website from the Department of Homeland Security, recommends that you create multiple emergency kits and keep them in several locations: your home, workplace, and your car. 

Your home’s emergency kit should be the most extensive, and should include everything you need to shelter in place for up to three days. Your larger emergency kit should include go-bags that can easily travel with you if you need to evacuate quickly. Cover your bases when things are peachy, and emergencies will feel less like near death experiences.

When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Thanks for your support!

Create a kit that contains the following basic items and incorporates additional selections depending on your family’s needs:

Checkmark

Candy is always a crowd pleaser in a crisis, and has the added benefit of being a high calorie food. Pack your family’s favorite sweets to bring some calm to a scary situation.

Additional Supplies (depending on your individual needs)

  • Infant formula, diapers, baby wipes, etc. 
  • Pet carrier, food, water, and comfort item
  • Sleeping bags/blankets for each member of your group
  • Change of clothes per person
  • Feminine hygiene supplies
  • Disposable utensils and plates
  • Paper and pens
  • Activities to keep young children and restless adults occupied

You’re off to a great start! Let’s keep on trucking.

Pug wrapped in blanket
Don’t forget about your pets.

About the Authors

It takes a village! We are researching, writing and fact checking as a family. Collaboration is the name of the game, whether we’re running from a zombie horde or finding the best way to turn a complex concept into a deliciously digestible set of bullet points.

Katherine Esperanza is a Los Angeles based writer. When she's not conjuring new queer slice-of-life short stories, she's busy watching the newest films, out at queer shows, supporting queer artists, or just checking out the queer community as a whole.

A former international non-profiteer, small business owner, and co-op'er, Katherine is delighted to help introduce more leftist politics into the disaster preparedness/prepper sphere, which is currently far too right-wing.