Monsoon Preparedness

I don’t believe she is actually experiencing rainfall. This is a fib.

How much rain constitutes a monsoon? Is it always specific to a season? Why don’t we call every heavy rain a monsoon? Why is this so confusing? Calgon, take me away!

Why Should You Worry About Monsoons?

Even if you’re confused about monsoons, you can understand why what happened in Kentucky in August of 2022 shook the nation.

As the state was hit by almost a foot of rain, the death toll reached 35 and over 100 people went missing. Over 12,000 Kentuckians had to live without power for days. Homes and workplaces were completely destroyed by the heavy rains, followed by flash floods. 

The disaster was such a major blow to those mountain communities that it precipitated Vice President Harris’ announcement of a $1B commitment to addressing the climate crisis

That was a single week in Kentucky. The rest of us are probably safe, right? MAYBE NOT, MR. OPTIMISTIC.

Flooding

Floods are the most fatal byproduct of a monsoon. 2021 recorded the second-highest total of flood-related casualties in the US, with 146 people being killedThe average per year is 98, making floods the second-deadliest weather hazard in the US.

Lightning

You heard it here first: lightning and rain go hand in hand. Lightning strikes more often during monsoon season. If you think lightning is just a pretty flash in the sky, you should be aware that lightning kills 20 people in America every year. Hundreds of others are injured and left to live with lifelong neurological damage. 

Rule of Thumb

Remember Powder? Never forget.

Rain isn’t always a concern, but it can cause huge problems, so it’s a good idea to stay alert during the rainy season. While it’s fun watching the raindrops race down your windowpane, it isn’t as much fun when you are the one racing to save your life from a heavy downpour. It’s easier if you’re prepared, though!

In this guide, we’ll help you get prepared for a monsoon by covering:

But the real questions is, am I more likely to win the lottery after I’m hit by lightning?

About the Authors

It takes a village! We are researching, writing and fact checking as a family. Collaboration is the name of the game, whether we’re running from a zombie horde or finding the best way to turn a complex concept into a deliciously digestible set of bullet points.

Katherine Esperanza is a Los Angeles based writer. When she's not conjuring new queer slice-of-life short stories, she's busy watching the newest films, out at queer shows, supporting queer artists, or just checking out the queer community as a whole.

A former international non-profiteer, small business owner, and co-op'er, Katherine is delighted to help introduce more leftist politics into the disaster preparedness/prepper sphere, which is currently far too right-wing.